Glossary

A.
Adulteration
Introduction of something to a food product to make it impure or inferior which may cause a health hazard.
After care instructions
Verbal and written education/or information provided to client after an invasive procedure.
B.
Bacteria
A single cell micro-organism that may cause disease in plants, animals or humans.
Blood-bourne Infections
Infections (e.g. HIV, Hepatitis B (HBV), Hepatitis C (HCV) infections) spread through contaminated blood or other body fluids, including semen, vaginal secretions or saliva.
C.
Certified Food Handler
Food handler that has successfully completed Peel Public Health’s Food Safety training course, or an equivalent, recognized course.
Cleaning
The process of removing visible dirt using water, detergent and friction. Step required prior to disinfection and sterilization.
Closed
The term CLOSED means that a public health inspector found a health risk/danger and closed the establishment or service until the risks are removed. The service or premises will be re-opened once the public health inspector has determined that the health risk has been removed.
Cold Holding
Potentially hazardous cold food must be stored or held at 4°C or below to prevent the growth of harmful micro-organisms.
Conditional Pass
The term CONDITIONAL PASS means that the business establishment is not following all applicable laws and health and safety regulations. Items that pose a risk of illness must be corrected at the time of inspection.
Contact time
The time a disinfectant remains wet on a surface and/or instrument.
Contamination
For food businesses contamination is the exposure of food to conditions that introduce foreign matter, disease causing microorganisms, and/or toxins.
Cooking Temperature
Potentially hazardous foods must be cooked up to the following temperatures for 15 seconds to kill any harmful bacteria: Pork 71°C (160°F), Poultry (chicken, duck, turkey) pieces including ground poultry 71°C (160°F), Poultry whole 82°C (180°F), Ground Meat other than poultry 71°C (160°F), Other food mixtures and dishes 74°C (165°F).
Critical Risk Infractions
Issues found during an inspection that present an immediate health hazard when not corrected. A re-inspection is required to ensure critical risk infractions have been corrected.
D.
Danger Zone
Rapid growth of bacteria occurs when food is allowed to sit in the “Danger Zone” between 4º C and 60º C.
Dipper Well
A sink used to rinse utensils under a constant stream of water to prevent growth of microorganisms. For example ice cream scoops.
Disinfectant
A substance used on inanimate objects that destroys bacteria, fungi, viruses and some bacterial spores. Disinfectants are classified as high, intermediate or low level disinfectants.
Disinfection
A process that kills or destroys most disease-producing microorganisms, with exceptions of bacterial spores (see definitions for high, intermediate and low level disinfection). Disinfection should not be confused with sterilization.
Disposed/seized
An action taken by a public health inspector to reduce or eliminate a health hazard.
E.
Enforcement
Issuing a closure order, summons, or ticket.
Exposure
Contact with blood and/or body fluids a substance or a thing.
F.
Food Contact Surface
Any surface, equipment or utensil that comes in contact with food during preparation or serving.
Food Service Premise
Food Service Premise: means any food premise where meals or meal portions are prepared for immediate consumption or sold or served in a form that will permit immediate consumption on the premises or elsewhere.
Foodborne Illness
Also known as “food poisoning” can happen when you eat food that is contaminated with harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, toxins, or chemicals.
H.
Hand Washing
Washing hands using warm water and soap, lathering with soap for 15 seconds, rinsing, and drying hands with paper towels in a designated hand wash sink.
Hazardous Food
Any food that is able to allow the growth of harmful microorganisms, generally food that is high in protein and moisture content. Examples include: meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products.
Health Hazard
A condition of a premises, a substance, thing, plant or animal other than a human, or a solid, liquid, gas or combination of any of them, that has or that is likely to have an adverse effect on the health of any person.
Health Protection and Promotion Act
Legislation that oversees health units and their delivery of public health programs and services to prevent the spread of disease.
Heat resistant spores
Spores that cannot be killed with heat.
High-level disinfectant
Kills all microorganisms (bacteria, fungi and viruses) except bacterial spore.
Hot Holding
Potentially hazardous hot food must be stored or held at 60°C or above to prevent the growth of harmful microorganisms.
I.
In Compliance
Observed item meets the minimum public health requirement outlined in the provincial regulation and/or guidelines and/or regional by-laws.
Infection Prevention and Control
Programs and strategies to prevent and control infectious diseases.
Infection Prevention and Control for Personal Service Settings Guideline
A guideline (http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/pro/programs/publichealth/oph_standards/docs/pssp_2008.pdf) published by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that comprises general recommendations for all personal service settings and equipment.
Inspection Result
The outcome of the inspection is known as the inspection result. There are three possible results: Pass, Conditional Pass and Closed.
Instrument classification
Equipment/devices used in personal services are classified into critical, semi-critical and non-critical depending on their use. (Critical equipment/device, Semi-critical and Non-critical)
Intermediate-level disinfectant
Kills most bacteria, fungi, viruses and mycobacteria.
Internal Food Temperature
Cold holding, hot holding, and cooking temperatures are measured by their internal food temperature by using a probe thermometer to obtain the most accurate storage or cooking temperature.
Invasive procedure
A personal service that involves intentionally breaking the skin or mucous membrane, including but not limited, tattooing, ear piercing, electrolysis and micropigmentation (permanent make-up).
L.
Low-level disinfectant
Kills some viruses, bacteria, and fungi.
M.
Meets Requirements
Observed item meets the minimum public health requirement outlined in the Ontario Food Premises Regulation.
Microorganisms
Bacteria, viruses, fungi or parasites that cannot be seen without a microscope. Some are harmful and can cause disease, infection or illness.
N.
Non–Critical Infractions
Infractions found during an inspection that are not a health hazard and usually do not require a re-inspection. The infraction should be corrected in a timely manner before the next scheduled inspection.
Non-invasive procedure
Any procedure that does not intentionally break the skin (e.g. hair cutting, facial, waxing, threading, etc.).
Not in compliance
Observed items does not meet minimum requirements outlined on the provincial regulations or guidelines and/or regional by-laws.
O.
Ontario Food Premises Regulation 562/90
Legislation that sets out the minimum requirements that all food establishments must follow. Public health inspectors base their food safety inspections on this regulation.
Order
A public health inspector can issue an order under section 13 of the Health Protection and Promotion Act. An order is issued when there are reasonable and probable grounds that a health hazard exists and the requirements specified in the order are necessary to decrease or eliminate the health hazard. The order may include an order to close the premises or part of the premises (closure order), do work, remove anything, clean and disinfect, destroy something, prohibit something, prohibit the use of a premises or thing as well as other reasons. For details refer to section 13 of the Health Protection and Promotion Act.
P.
Packaging
Packaging materials are required during the sterilization process. The packaging maintains sterility of the processed item. Packaging materials should be designed for the type of sterilization process being used.
Pass
The term PASS means that the business establishment is following all applicable laws and health and safety regulations.
Personal Service Settings
Means a business premises situated within the geographical territory governed by the Region, where a personal service is provided or offered to members of the public. Examples include spas, salons and tattoo studios.
Public Health Inspector
The requirements for employment as a public health inspector are that the person; be the holder of a certificate granted by the Board of Certification of Public Health Inspectors of The Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors; is registered as a veterinarian under the Veterinarians Act and is the holder of a certificate in veterinary public health or has experience that the Minister considers equivalent to such registration and certification; or be the holder of a certificate issued prior to the 1st day of July, 1979 by The Canadian Public Health Association or by a certifying organization that is recognized by The Canadian Public Health Association. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 566, s. 5.
R.
Rapid Reheating
Food that is reheated must be reheated to the original cooking temperature within two hours before serving.
Receptacle
A container that receives or holds something (e.g. laundry bin).
Re-inspection
Follow-up visits are conducted to verify if an infraction has been corrected. Re-inspections may be required if the violation is considered a critical infraction, or as deemed necessary by a Public Health Inspector.
Reusable instruments
Equipment/devices used during the process of carrying out personal services that can be cleaned and disinfected after each use (e.g. tweezers).
Routine Inspection
An inspection where a public health inspector visits a business (or facility), usually unannounced. Inspections are based on the requirements outlined in the provincial regulation and/or guidelines and/or regional by-laws.
Routine practices
Term used by Health Canada/Public Health Agency of Canada to describe the system of infection prevention and control practices to prevent and control transmission of microorganisms. These practices describe prevention and control strategies to be used with all clients during all care.
S.
Sanitize
Reducing the number of harmful microorganisms to a safe level with the use of an approved sanitizing solution
Semi-critical infractions
Infractions that present a potential health hazard. See http://www.peelregion.ca/health/pss/pdfs/operators-information-guide.pdf
Service(s) Closed
The operator has been ordered to stop providing a specific service or service(s) in a Personal Service Setting. The public health inspector identified a health hazard and issued a Section 13 Order under the Health Protection and Promotion Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.H.7.
Sharps
Any item that may penetrate the skin such as blades, lancets, razors and needles.
Sharps container
A puncture-resistant and leak resistant biohazard container specifically designed for the safe disposal of sharp instruments (e.g. needles, syringes, scalpels, razor blades). Securing and disposing of all containers must be in accordance with the requirements of the Ontario Environmental Protection Act and regulated regulations, and any other applicable law.
Significant Risk Infractions
Issues found during an inspection may cause foodborne illness when not corrected. Significant risk infractions can often be corrected at the time of inspection and usually do not require a re-inspection.
Single-use disposable items
Any instruments or items that are designed to be used once and then discarded as they cannot be adequately cleaned and disinfected or sterilized.
Spore test/biological monitoring
Means the use (according to Manufacturers’ specifications) of a commercially prepared biological indicator test system containing viable spores to monitor the fitness and effectiveness of sterilizing equipment. A failed spore test indicates that the sterilizer may be malfunctioning or there was a process or packaging error.
Sterilization
Process of destroying all forms of microbial life including infectious bacteria, viruses, yeasts, moulds and bacterial spores. Sterilization should not be confused with disinfection which does not kill spores.
Sterilizer
A device used to destroy microorganisms and spores using steam and dry heat. The device must be permitted for use by the Region of Peel Public Health.
Summons
A summons requires the business owner or operator to appear in court rather than just pay a set fine. A trial may proceed and a Justice of the Peace will determine guilt of the owner or operator and set a fine to be paid.
T.
Temperature sensitive indicator
Tape or label which changes colour if the packaged item was processed. Indicator must be specific to the type of sterilizer used. The colour change provides a visual verification that each package has been processed.
Tickets
Tickets are usually issued if infractions (violations) of the provincial regulation and/or guidelines and/or regional by-laws are observed by a public health inspector.
U.
Ultrasonic cleaning device
A machine that cleans instruments by ultrasound waves. Also known as an ultrasonic cleaner.